What do Latter-day Saints (Mormons) Believe About the Fall (Part I of III)

What do Latter-day Saints (Mormons) Believe About the Fall (Part I of III)

The Fall of Adam and Eve

The Atonement cannot be properly understood without an understanding of the Fall. The two go hand in hand. The Fall refers to the partaking of the forbidden fruit by Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden and their being cast out of the garden into mortal life (genesis 3). It can be said that they “fell forward.” It was a necessary and planned step in the Father’s plan of salvation for us. It brought with it physical death and also brought spiritual death (being cut off from the direct physical presence of god). The Atone- ment of Jesus Christ overcomes physical death for all, through the universal resurrection of the dead (1 Corinthians 15:22). It also makes it possible for those who will to repent and overcome spiritual death and thus return to the physical presence of the Father, to live with Him forever in celestial glory.
adam and eve endowmentWhile other churches teach that the Fall was a terrible tragedy and brought unfortunate misery upon all mankind, the true gospel teaches that it was good and is a great blessing for all of us. While many churches criticize and even vilify Adam and Eve, especially Eve, for partaking of the forbidden fruit, we honor them and hold them in highest esteem for taking this vital step which opened the door for all of us to come to earth. The fact that the Fall was good and was part of the Father’s plan is clearly taught by Lehi in the Book of Mormon as he gives a brief and concentrated overview of the Fall and Atonement. As you read the verses quoted next, note the important points emphasized by the Savior through His prophet, Lehi, including: (more…)

Why Do Some Mainstream Christians Oppose Mormonism?

Why Do Some Mainstream Christians Oppose Mormonism?

Many people are simply mislead or uninformed on what Latter-day Saints (“Mormons”) believe about doctrines concerning Jesus Christ, the Bible, and temples. I can testify that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (inadvertently called by friends of other faiths, the “Mormon Church”) believes in all the teachings that Jesus Christ has given us thus far, as well as in following continuing revelation given by modern day apostles and prophets. The Church teaches its members to love and serve others, and to keep the commandments of God. Mormons support the Bible as well as additional inspired scripture, such as the Book of Mormon, that have been given to the world by revelation. I know that the Church of Jesus Christ is guided by Jesus Christ and is in harmony with Him and His teachings. I’ve felt the Holy Spirit testify this to me as I’ve striven to keep the commandments, follow the ordained prophet of God, and serve those around me. (more…)

What Can Mormons Do For Entertainment?

What Can Mormons Do For Entertainment?

There are some who may be a bit confused or lack a complete understanding of what members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (“Mormons”) believe about entertainment. Mormons believe that wholesome entertainment and recreational activities are good and important.

Mormons playing basketballThere is much dancing, theater, film, art, sports, and other recreation that is uplifting and good, but there is also much of it that is degrading and immoral. Mormons believe in seeking after those things that are “virtuous, ilovely, or of good report or praiseworthy” and staying away from material that is immoral and offensive to God (Articles of Faith 1:13).

In my own family, I’ve seen what a difference it can make to have wholesome and virtuous entertainment in the house. When this kind of entertainment is present, there has been much more happiness and love in my home. Wholesome recreation and entertainment can be a means of strengthening families and bring people closer to Jesus Christ. My life has been blessed with more meaningful experiences and friendships as I’ve participated in good entertainment with Mormon youth my age as well as those not my age. D. Lauritsen, a Mormon professor, gives an explanation bellow that gives further enlightenment on this subject to those not of our faith: (more…)

Do Mormons Celebrate Thanksgiving?

Do Mormons Celebrate Thanksgiving?

Karen Trifiletti, MA is a Philadelphia-born convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, single mother of two, writer, and non-profit business professional.

Yes, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (“Mormons”) living in the United States and also in Canada, do typically celebrate Thanksgiving, which is regarded as a national holiday. (It should be noted that Mormons are a diverse, global religious people, of all ethnicities, and that the majority of Mormons—7,963,489– actually reside ‘outside’ of the United States).

Mormons Celebrate ThanksgivingLatter-day Saints (nicknamed “Mormons” as a result of belief in a volume of scripture titled, The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ— recording God’s interaction with ancient inhabitants of the Americas), do celebrate many traditional holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter.  They are a people, like those of many faiths, who are Christ-centered,  family-centered, and who enjoy the communion of friends, a good meal, social gatherings, and opportunities to reflect and renew the most important relational and ultimately, divine, aspects of life.  Life in Christ is the life of a striving Latter-day Saint; gratitude.  They believe that men and women are “that they may have joy” and have it “more abundantly” through the provisions of Jesus Christ, the results of His Sovereign work in our individual and national and international lives (John 10:10, 2 Nephi 2:25). (more…)

Holy Communion: What Do Mormons Practice?

Holy Communion: What Do Mormons Practice?

By Eric Kotter, a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (“Mormon“). A student at BYU-Idaho studying communications, and freelance writer.

When Jesus Christ was on the earth He gave bread and wine to His twelve apostles and said, “This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you” (Luke 22:19-20).

Holy Communion: A Symbol of Jesus Christ’s Atoning Sacrifice

Holy CommunionAs a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (inadvertently called by friends of other faiths, the “Mormon Church”) I participate each week during worship services in an ordinance called the sacrament. The sacrament is similar to Holy Communion which many other faiths participate in. One difference between the Holy Communion that Mormons participate in, and Catholic Communion, is that we do not believe in the doctrine of transubstantiation, which is a belief that the bread and wine literally turn into the blood and body of Jesus Christ as the person partakes. We believe that Jesus Christ instituted the sacrament, the bread and wine, to represent His body and blood, which were given to us as a sacrifice to lift the burden and judgments of our sins, trials and weaknesses as we follow Him. We partake of the sacrament as symbols of what He did for us. Partaking of the sacrament is a blessing Jesus Christ gave to His followers so they can renew their baptismal covenants to follow Him that they might become clean from their sins.

In the Doctrine and Covenants, a book of modern revelation given by God, the Lord gave us the purpose of the sacrament. The Lord said, “And that thou mayest more fully keep thyself unspotted from the world, thou shalt go to the house of prayer and offer up thy sacraments upon my holy day” (Doctrine and Covenants 59:9). (more…)

A Christmas Story Part I

A Christmas Story Part I

Ardeth Greene Kapp is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She recently returned from the Canada Vancouver Mission, where her husband, Heber, presided from 1992 to 1995. Before their mission, Sister Kapp served as general president of the Young Women organization of the Church. A popular author and speaker, she has written several books, including My Neighbor, My Sister, My Friend; The Joy of the Journey; and What Stripling Warriors Learned from Their Mothers.

A Christmas Story: Christmas Traditions

Since I grew up in Alberta, Canada, I never had to dream of a white Christmas. There was always plenty of snow and cold at Christmas time. At least that’s how I remember it.

I also remember, besides the cold temperatures, the feeling of warmth, that happy feeling of being together as our parents, four aunts, uncles, and many cousins of all ages gathered at our grandparents’ big three-story house, where we remained from Christmas Eve clear through New Year’s Day.

Christmas Story mormonThis tradition must have seemed strange to the folks in our small town of Glenwood, since all of our aunts and uncles and cousins lived within walking distance of each other all year long, only a few blocks away from each other. It was not inconvenient for our dads and brothers to return home night and morning to milk the cows, do the chores, and be back in time for our large and happy family breakfast and evening supper. During the morning we played games and listened to favorite stories told and retold by our grandmother as we gathered around the large grate in the floor that let the heat pour out from the furnace below. In the afternoon we practiced for the evening’s talent show while our mothers made pies and cakes. I don’t remember what our dads did during the day, but they joined us as we all gathered for supper; and after the evening meal we presented a talent show to a very responsive audience, who all sang together. We had a family orchestra and it was agreed, especially by our grandpa, that we were a very musical family. (more…)

Copyright © 2019 AboutMormons. All Rights Reserved.
This website is not owned by or affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon or LDS Church). The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. The views expressed by individual users are the responsibility of those users and do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. For the official Church websites, please visit LDS.org or Mormon.org.